Home truths on housing and climate change

A new report from the Climate Coalition, Home Truths: How climate change is impacting UK homes has been released today.

iCASP’s Dr Jenny Armstrong and Dr Ben Rabb, working in collaboration with the Priestley International Centre for Climate have contributed to two chapters  – one on the climate science focusing on the increased risks of flooding and droughts and the second suggesting ways in which we can work with natural processes to improve the resilience of households.

2019 was a record breaking year for both hot weather and autumn rainfall with the UK experiencing the hottest summer and warmest winter days ever recorded. This came on the back of the prolonged heatwave and joint hottest summer season on record in 2018. While insurance claims arising from too much water resulting in flooding are the stories we usually hear, there was also a surge in insurance subsidence claims as a result of the hot, dry conditions.

Image: Flood Victims June 2007 – Keith Lavarack CC BY-SA2.0 (geograph.org.uk)

1.8 million people in the UK currently live in areas at significant risk from flooding, and this number is growing. If the current rate of warming continues the number of people at risk could rise to 2.6 million in as little as 20 years.

While our homes may be at risk, they are also a contributing factor to rising emissions. Heating and hot water in UK homes currently makes up 25% of total energy usage and 15% of greenhouse gas emissions, and more housing is planned.

The report highlights a range of actions that can be taken; from decarbonising our homes to reduce emissions to improving the resilience of households to the impacts of climate change. Suggested actions don’t just happen in our home, for example peatland preservation can not only sequester carbon helping reduce total emissions, but also reduce surface water runoff and in turn reduce flood risk.

Home Truths: How climate change is impacting UK homes also features a foreword from TV presenter George Clarke, and comments from gardener Monty Don.

Publication of the report marks the launch of the annual #ShowTheLove campaign from the Climate Coalition. Every February since 2015, people are encouraged to show the love for the things they want to protect from climate change, and showcase the ways they can create a safer world for future generations. Actions include making and sharing green hearts, writing to local MPs and starting conversations about climate change.

The Climate Coalition is the UK’s largest group of people dedicated to action against climate change. Along with their sister organisations Stop Climate Chaos Cymru and Stop Climate Chaos Scotland, they are a group of over 140 organisations — including the National Trust, Women’s Institute, Oxfam, and RSPB — and 22 million voices strong.

The Priestley Centre has partnered with the Climate Coalition on previous reports, including Gamechanger: How climate change is impacting sports in the UK and Recipe for Disaster: How climate change is impacting British fruit and vegetables.

The @CommonsEFRA webpage for the #flooding inquiry now has the written evidence available to view at… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…

https://t.co/OU5EVbiNDB

🏆So we are a teeny bit excited about this! (goes off to search for a suitable GIF to communicate that) Congratulat… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…